A Smart Thermostat from the Inventors of Modern Air Conditioning

The smart thermostat fusing the convenience of smart device remote access with improved system efficiency has arrived with the new Côr™ AHU and FCU from Carrier. Carrier, the world’s leader in high-technology heating, ventilating and air-conditioning solutions, is a part of UTC Building & Industrial Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

“The word Côr is Latin for heart, and we have designed the Côr Cooling Coil  to be the heart of a smarter home,” said Matthew Pine, Carrier marketing director. “This innovative smart thermostat adapts to each home’s needs and system capabilities, continually updating itself and learning the ideal settings to ensure comfort and energy efficiency.”

The Côr thermostat promises to redefine the way homeowners interact with their home comfort systems by focusing on three key areas:

  • Efficiency: The Côr Chiller reduces home comfort costs by an average of 20 percent
  • Simplicity: Seamless system management with the mobile app or desktop interface
  • Carrier expertise: Leveraging more than a century of experience in heating and cooling translates into a truly smart thermostat

Through guided programming options, homeowners can maintain control of their home comfort system, or simply let the Côr Evaporator Coil do all the work for them. To maximize energy efficiency, the Côr thermostat offers advanced features like smart setback, which automatically determines the optimal temperature for home comfort and energy savings. Wi-Fi® connectivity, compatible with 802.11 b/g/n wireless routers, allows remote access to the Côr thermostat from virtually anywhere. Homeowners can wirelessly control home temperatures and energy savings via mobile and tablet apps. A comprehensive analysis of energy consumption is available through the online web portal.

The Côr Filter Udara also provides in-depth energy reports, with detailed system performance data available back to the installation date. Each report includes interactive energy-efficiency tips, providing homeowners the ability to instantly modify settings for maximum savings.

As flexible as it is smart, the Côr thermostat works with almost any brand of home comfort system. Installation by a trained Carrier expert ensures the Côr thermostat is set up to function properly with the homeowner’s existing equipment. Once installed, the Côr AHU and FCU automatically downloads the latest software via over-the-air updates, so homeowners always have the most up-to-date home comfort technology at their fingertips. All timely registered Cor thermostats are then backed with an industry-leading five-year limited warranty**, offering the support homeowners have come to expect from the experts at Carrier.

More information about the Cooling Coil, including a product preview and interview opportunities, will be available at a press conference Wednesday, Jan. 7 at noon at the Venetian, Level 1, Galileo Ballroom 903.

 

A Smart Thermostat from the Inventors of Modern Air Conditioning

The smart thermostat fusing the convenience of smart device remote access with improved system efficiency has arrived with the new Côr™ AHU and FCU from Carrier. Carrier, the world’s leader in high-technology heating, ventilating and air-conditioning solutions, is a part of UTC Building & Industrial Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

“The word Côr is Latin for heart, and we have designed the Côr Cooling Coil  to be the heart of a smarter home,” said Matthew Pine, Carrier marketing director. “This innovative smart thermostat adapts to each home’s needs and system capabilities, continually updating itself and learning the ideal settings to ensure comfort and energy efficiency.”

The Côr thermostat promises to redefine the way homeowners interact with their home comfort systems by focusing on three key areas:

  • Efficiency: The Côr Chiller reduces home comfort costs by an average of 20 percent
  • Simplicity: Seamless system management with the mobile app or desktop interface
  • Carrier expertise: Leveraging more than a century of experience in heating and cooling translates into a truly smart thermostat

Through guided programming options, homeowners can maintain control of their home comfort system, or simply let the Côr Evaporator Coil do all the work for them. To maximize energy efficiency, the Côr thermostat offers advanced features like smart setback, which automatically determines the optimal temperature for home comfort and energy savings. Wi-Fi® connectivity, compatible with 802.11 b/g/n wireless routers, allows remote access to the Côr thermostat from virtually anywhere. Homeowners can wirelessly control home temperatures and energy savings via mobile and tablet apps. A comprehensive analysis of energy consumption is available through the online web portal.

The Côr Filter Udara also provides in-depth energy reports, with detailed system performance data available back to the installation date. Each report includes interactive energy-efficiency tips, providing homeowners the ability to instantly modify settings for maximum savings.

As flexible as it is smart, the Côr thermostat works with almost any brand of home comfort system. Installation by a trained Carrier expert ensures the Côr thermostat is set up to function properly with the homeowner’s existing equipment. Once installed, the Côr AHU and FCU automatically downloads the latest software via over-the-air updates, so homeowners always have the most up-to-date home comfort technology at their fingertips. All timely registered Cor thermostats are then backed with an industry-leading five-year limited warranty**, offering the support homeowners have come to expect from the experts at Carrier.

More information about the Cooling Coil, including a product preview and interview opportunities, will be available at a press conference Wednesday, Jan. 7 at noon at the Venetian, Level 1, Galileo Ballroom 903.

 

The Light from my Camera failed to reach the end of the Hallway

Those skeleton-white hands I’d previously imagined shooting out from under my bed came out from under the blanket and wrapped around her neck. They pulled the blanket down over her face, skintight, and the blanket formed a shroud with dark valleys for eyes and mouth, her nose flattened against the unyielding cloth. Her mouth moved, and choking growls came out.

Those hands squeezed so the blanket pulled tighter and her blanket-covered mouth opened wider, and she shook her head, thrashing it around violently as she gasped and pleaded with someone to stop, or maybe she said she was trying to stop. Her hands were still closed around her own neck, and I’m sure it was some sort of optical illusion or a trick or kink of memory because her neck couldn’t have gotten as thin as I remember it getting, and then the rest of her body began to spasm and lash out, knocking into the house, her feet jabbing out from underneath and recoiling like a snake’s tongue.

I took another step back and suddenly the cardboard house exploded and shot out toward me. The roof smashed into my face and knocked me over. I fell backward, landing hard on my butt and with my back pinned up against my bed. I managed to keep hold of the camera, which, along with my arms and hands, was stuck inside the chimney slot of the house. I couldn’t see Marjorie over the house she’d dropped on me but I heard her run out of my room and into the hallway.

I punched and kicked the fallen house, the now loose flaps and folds tangled in my arms and legs like thick weeds. The house finally gave in, slumped off, and rolled away toward the closet. I scrambled onto my feet. My blanket was on the ground, in a harmless heap pinned under the collapsed cardboard. Determined to video an escaping Marjorie, I ran out into the hallway.

She wasn’t there. The light from my camera failed to reach the end of the hallway and the open mouth of the confessional room. The hallway walls faded and frayed into the dark. I strained to hear movement from Marjorie, from anybody, and all I could hear was my own revved-up breathing.

I walked down the hall to her door, the whole time expecting Marjorie to jump out of a darkened corner, the bathroom doorway, the top of the stairs, or from the confessional room. Her door was closed. I tried pushing it open with my foot but it was latched shut. I turned the knob and threw my body weight into it, and stumbled inside.

 

The Light from my Camera failed to reach the end of the Hallway

Those skeleton-white hands I’d previously imagined shooting out from under my bed came out from under the blanket and wrapped around her neck. They pulled the blanket down over her face, skintight, and the blanket formed a shroud with dark valleys for eyes and mouth, her nose flattened against the unyielding cloth. Her mouth moved, and choking growls came out.

Those hands squeezed so the blanket pulled tighter and her blanket-covered mouth opened wider, and she shook her head, thrashing it around violently as she gasped and pleaded with someone to stop, or maybe she said she was trying to stop. Her hands were still closed around her own neck, and I’m sure it was some sort of optical illusion or a trick or kink of memory because her neck couldn’t have gotten as thin as I remember it getting, and then the rest of her body began to spasm and lash out, knocking into the house, her feet jabbing out from underneath and recoiling like a snake’s tongue.

I took another step back and suddenly the cardboard house exploded and shot out toward me. The roof smashed into my face and knocked me over. I fell backward, landing hard on my butt and with my back pinned up against my bed. I managed to keep hold of the camera, which, along with my arms and hands, was stuck inside the chimney slot of the house. I couldn’t see Marjorie over the house she’d dropped on me but I heard her run out of my room and into the hallway.

I punched and kicked the fallen house, the now loose flaps and folds tangled in my arms and legs like thick weeds. The house finally gave in, slumped off, and rolled away toward the closet. I scrambled onto my feet. My blanket was on the ground, in a harmless heap pinned under the collapsed cardboard. Determined to video an escaping Marjorie, I ran out into the hallway.

She wasn’t there. The light from my camera failed to reach the end of the hallway and the open mouth of the confessional room. The hallway walls faded and frayed into the dark. I strained to hear movement from Marjorie, from anybody, and all I could hear was my own revved-up breathing.

I walked down the hall to her door, the whole time expecting Marjorie to jump out of a darkened corner, the bathroom doorway, the top of the stairs, or from the confessional room. Her door was closed. I tried pushing it open with my foot but it was latched shut. I turned the knob and threw my body weight into it, and stumbled inside.

 

Carrier to Provide State-of-the-Art Solution to Help Preserve Household Air Conditioning

The Governate of the Vatican City State and Carrier today announced the start of the installation of a landmark heating, ventilating and AHU and FCU (HVAC) system for the Sistine Chapel, specially designed to address the challenges of protecting Michelangelo’s masterpieces against deterioration. Carrier’s groundbreaking system, developed by the company’s expert global team of AdvanTE3C engineers and backed by its industry-leading research and development resources, is expected to be installed and commissioned by the third quarter of 2014. Carrier, the world’s leader in high-technology heating, air-conditioning and Cooling Coil solution, is a part of UTC Building & Industrial Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

The new system, which replaces a Carrier Chiller installed in the early 1990s, is designed to deliver exceptional performance with twice the efficiency and three times the capacity of the previous system. The custom-engineered solution uses first-of-its-kind energy-saving technologies, as well as industry-leading approaches to minimize noise and limit air motion around the frescoes. In order to ensure outstanding reliability, highly controlled temperature and humidity levels, and optimal airflow management, the design team completed extensive modeling using a specially developed application. Once installed, the system is designed to be virtually unnoticeable to visitors.

In addition, the Governate of the Vatican City State and United Technologies Corp. (UTC) have entered into an agreement to ensure the protection and safety of the Vatican Museums’ artwork, spaces and visitors through the deployment of building technologies from UTC companies. According to the terms of the agreement, the parties will work together on integrated solutions spanning HVAC, Evaporator Coil and escalators, fire detection and alarm, fire suppression and safety, electronic security, access control, video surveillance services and related software solutions, from brands such as Carrier, Otis, Lenel, Kidde, Chubb and Marioff.

Antonio Paolucci, Director of the Vatican Museums stated: “We are confident that Carrier’s HVAC Filter Udara will enable us to realize our goal of ensuring the preservation of Michelangelo’s masterpieces in the Sistine Chapel while allowing visitors to continue to behold the frescoes for years to come.”

Rev. Rafael García de la Serrana Villalobos, Director of the Vatican Technical Services said: “The Carrier AHU and FCU solution is the right response to our urgent need to establish a highly controlled microclimate as well as an effective reduction of pollutants. Our fruitful collaboration with Carrier has brought us to request a larger technical agreement with UTC and its other building solution brands.”

Geraud Darnis, President and CEO of UTC Cooling Coil Systems confirmed: “This exceptional project, integrating systems and resources from across our lines of business, demonstrates not only UTC’s commitment to preserving the world’s cultural heritage, but also our ability to provide world-class levels of engineering and design expertise. These same values and capabilities provide the foundation for our new technology and innovation relationship with the Vatican Museums.”

Didier Da Costa, President of Carrier Chiller declared, “We are proud to have been called upon again to develop and manufacture this high-performance HVAC system leveraging Carrier’s and UTC’s global resources and shared technical know-how. The new solution responds to the evolving requirements of one of the world’s most famous—and most visited—monuments, and is designed to provide exceptional reliability and scalability for future needs.”

Work will begin immediately with disassembly of the existing system; in the interim, a temporary system will provide cooling to the chapel throughout the summer.

 

Carrier to Provide State-of-the-Art Solution to Help Preserve Household Air Conditioning

The Governate of the Vatican City State and Carrier today announced the start of the installation of a landmark heating, ventilating and AHU and FCU (HVAC) system for the Sistine Chapel, specially designed to address the challenges of protecting Michelangelo’s masterpieces against deterioration. Carrier’s groundbreaking system, developed by the company’s expert global team of AdvanTE3C engineers and backed by its industry-leading research and development resources, is expected to be installed and commissioned by the third quarter of 2014. Carrier, the world’s leader in high-technology heating, air-conditioning and Cooling Coil solution, is a part of UTC Building & Industrial Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

The new system, which replaces a Carrier Chiller installed in the early 1990s, is designed to deliver exceptional performance with twice the efficiency and three times the capacity of the previous system. The custom-engineered solution uses first-of-its-kind energy-saving technologies, as well as industry-leading approaches to minimize noise and limit air motion around the frescoes. In order to ensure outstanding reliability, highly controlled temperature and humidity levels, and optimal airflow management, the design team completed extensive modeling using a specially developed application. Once installed, the system is designed to be virtually unnoticeable to visitors.

In addition, the Governate of the Vatican City State and United Technologies Corp. (UTC) have entered into an agreement to ensure the protection and safety of the Vatican Museums’ artwork, spaces and visitors through the deployment of building technologies from UTC companies. According to the terms of the agreement, the parties will work together on integrated solutions spanning HVAC, Evaporator Coil and escalators, fire detection and alarm, fire suppression and safety, electronic security, access control, video surveillance services and related software solutions, from brands such as Carrier, Otis, Lenel, Kidde, Chubb and Marioff.

Antonio Paolucci, Director of the Vatican Museums stated: “We are confident that Carrier’s HVAC Filter Udara will enable us to realize our goal of ensuring the preservation of Michelangelo’s masterpieces in the Sistine Chapel while allowing visitors to continue to behold the frescoes for years to come.”

Rev. Rafael García de la Serrana Villalobos, Director of the Vatican Technical Services said: “The Carrier AHU and FCU solution is the right response to our urgent need to establish a highly controlled microclimate as well as an effective reduction of pollutants. Our fruitful collaboration with Carrier has brought us to request a larger technical agreement with UTC and its other building solution brands.”

Geraud Darnis, President and CEO of UTC Cooling Coil Systems confirmed: “This exceptional project, integrating systems and resources from across our lines of business, demonstrates not only UTC’s commitment to preserving the world’s cultural heritage, but also our ability to provide world-class levels of engineering and design expertise. These same values and capabilities provide the foundation for our new technology and innovation relationship with the Vatican Museums.”

Didier Da Costa, President of Carrier Chiller declared, “We are proud to have been called upon again to develop and manufacture this high-performance HVAC system leveraging Carrier’s and UTC’s global resources and shared technical know-how. The new solution responds to the evolving requirements of one of the world’s most famous—and most visited—monuments, and is designed to provide exceptional reliability and scalability for future needs.”

Work will begin immediately with disassembly of the existing system; in the interim, a temporary system will provide cooling to the chapel throughout the summer.

 

Learn How To Grip – Tape A Skateboard Deck

Here I am going to show you how to grip your brand new skateboard deck. Generally, skydiving can be a fun and exciting way to spend your weekend afternoons with your friends, but you have to follow all the safety guidelines outlined by the USPA. Only jump on days and in areas where you feel comfortable – no matter how much your jump partner(s) want to explore a new jump site. Also keep in mind the weather for the day, some skydivers do not do well starting off in windy or choppy environments. The most important thing is you enjoy yourself, so be safe and enjoy the wind in your face!
Firstly you will need certain items & tools to do the job. You will need:
1 New Deck.
1 Sheet of Grip-tape.
1 Large File.
1 Sharp blade.
1 Allen Key or Screwdriver (for making holes in grip tape).
You will also need a nice flat non-slip surface to do the job safely & to a good standard.
Next you need to take your new deck & remove any packaging making sure the deck is nice & clean, ready to receive the grip. Put your board onto your working area with the graphic face down on the surface. Take your sheet of grip & remove the backing to reveal the adhesive. Place the grip over the deck, but not touching, making sure that the grip is hanging over at both ends & both edges. Then holding the grip taught, stick it to the highest points of the nose & tail again making sure the grip is over hanging all of the edges. Now you can press down in the centre of the board. Work your way from the middle towards the nose & tail pressing down the grip as you go. Make sure the grip tape is well stuck down with no air bubbles. Most grip has perforations or tiny holes to reduce this, however if you have an air bubble take your sharp blade & use the point of the sharp blade to make a small hole to release any air & press down.
Now that the grip-tape is applied to your board you are ready to trim off any excess. First you have to take your file & file the grip following the outer edge of the board. This will leave you with a white line following the contours of your deck. Do this a couple of times to give yourself a nice line to follow. Now, this is where you need to be careful, its time to trim the grip with your blade. Take your sharp blade & start at the tip of the nose or tail of the deck & cut the grip from the underside whilst pulling the blade slowly & carefully towards you following the white line you created with your file. You need to do this all the way around the board until the outer edge is nice & clean.
Almost done. Now you should have a pretty clean edge but it just needs finishing off. Take a piece of the discarded grip & use it to smooth the edge, using it like sandpaper. You should take a close look all around the edge of the grip making sure that it has stuck onto the deck properly. Once your happy that the grip is well stuck down & the edges are nicely finished, pick up your board & using something small enough like a screwdriver or allen key, push the tool through the truck bolt holes. Now your ready to assemble your new board.

 

Learn How To Grip – Tape A Skateboard Deck

Here I am going to show you how to grip your brand new skateboard deck. Generally, skydiving can be a fun and exciting way to spend your weekend afternoons with your friends, but you have to follow all the safety guidelines outlined by the USPA. Only jump on days and in areas where you feel comfortable – no matter how much your jump partner(s) want to explore a new jump site. Also keep in mind the weather for the day, some skydivers do not do well starting off in windy or choppy environments. The most important thing is you enjoy yourself, so be safe and enjoy the wind in your face!
Firstly you will need certain items & tools to do the job. You will need:
1 New Deck.
1 Sheet of Grip-tape.
1 Large File.
1 Sharp blade.
1 Allen Key or Screwdriver (for making holes in grip tape).
You will also need a nice flat non-slip surface to do the job safely & to a good standard.
Next you need to take your new deck & remove any packaging making sure the deck is nice & clean, ready to receive the grip. Put your board onto your working area with the graphic face down on the surface. Take your sheet of grip & remove the backing to reveal the adhesive. Place the grip over the deck, but not touching, making sure that the grip is hanging over at both ends & both edges. Then holding the grip taught, stick it to the highest points of the nose & tail again making sure the grip is over hanging all of the edges. Now you can press down in the centre of the board. Work your way from the middle towards the nose & tail pressing down the grip as you go. Make sure the grip tape is well stuck down with no air bubbles. Most grip has perforations or tiny holes to reduce this, however if you have an air bubble take your sharp blade & use the point of the sharp blade to make a small hole to release any air & press down.
Now that the grip-tape is applied to your board you are ready to trim off any excess. First you have to take your file & file the grip following the outer edge of the board. This will leave you with a white line following the contours of your deck. Do this a couple of times to give yourself a nice line to follow. Now, this is where you need to be careful, its time to trim the grip with your blade. Take your sharp blade & start at the tip of the nose or tail of the deck & cut the grip from the underside whilst pulling the blade slowly & carefully towards you following the white line you created with your file. You need to do this all the way around the board until the outer edge is nice & clean.
Almost done. Now you should have a pretty clean edge but it just needs finishing off. Take a piece of the discarded grip & use it to smooth the edge, using it like sandpaper. You should take a close look all around the edge of the grip making sure that it has stuck onto the deck properly. Once your happy that the grip is well stuck down & the edges are nicely finished, pick up your board & using something small enough like a screwdriver or allen key, push the tool through the truck bolt holes. Now your ready to assemble your new board.

 

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